Ubuntu’s philosophy and the challenge of Xenophobia: towards peace in Africa

Authors

  • Emmanuel Bassey Eyo Department of Philosophy, University of Calabar, Calabar Nigeria
  • Emmanuel E Etta Department of Philosophy, University of Calabar, Calabar Nigeria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33750/ijhi.v3i1.70

Keywords:

Ubuntu philosophy; Xenophobia; peace.

Abstract

Xenophobic attacks in South Africa have put to question the authenticity and veracity of Ubuntu philosophy. Remarkably, Ubuntu as a normative philosophy, promotes and conveys the openness and availability of the individuals for the benefits of others, especially in the paradigm of “I” and “others.” This philosophy unequivocally presents an African world view of care for others, the affirmation of the existence of others and the participation of others. Altruism, which is the western version of Ubuntu, encourages show of compassion, generosity, care and living with others. Yet, the resurgence of the xenophobic attack is a signpost of misguided individuals who have lost the traits of personhood and otherness, which are central in Ubuntu. Xenophobia breeds violence, hate, destruction of lives and property and threatens peace in Africa. Cognizant of this asymmetry between Ubuntu philosophy and xenophobia lineaments, this work attempts to restate a mutual need for African togetherness and maps a commitment to Ubuntu norms.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

2020-03-30

How to Cite

Eyo, E. B., & Etta, E. E. (2020). Ubuntu’s philosophy and the challenge of Xenophobia: towards peace in Africa. International Journal of Humanities and Innovation (IJHI), 3(1), 34–38. https://doi.org/10.33750/ijhi.v3i1.70

Issue

Section

Viewpoint